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Start Preamble Food find out here and Drug Administration, viagra connect amazon HHS. Notice of availability. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a revised draft guidance for industry entitled viagra connect amazon “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“revised draft guidance”). This revised draft guidance, when finalized, will describe how FDA intends to apply certain provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) to human drug products compounded by State-licensed pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities and distributed for use within a hospital or health system. First, it addresses the requirement that compounding be based on the receipt of a valid prescription order for an identified individual patient.

Second, it addresses the provision concerning compounded drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially viagra connect amazon available drug product. This draft guidance revises the draft guidance issued in 2016 entitled, “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“draft guidance”). FDA is revising the draft guidance to address stakeholder feedback and provide further clarification on policies regarding hospital and health system compounding. This revised draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at viagra connect amazon this time. Submit either electronic or written comments on the revised draft guidance by December 6, 2021 to ensure that the Agency considers your comment on this revised draft guidance before it begins work on the final version of the guidance.

Submit electronic or written comments on the proposed collection of information in the revised draft guidance by December 6, 2021. You may submit comments on any guidance viagra connect amazon at any time as follows. Electronic Submissions Submit electronic comments in the following way. Start Printed Page 55848 • Federal eRulemaking Portal. Https://www.regulations.gov.

Follow the instructions for submitting comments. Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to https://www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as medical information, your or anyone else's Social Security number, or confidential business information, such as a manufacturing process. Please note that if you include your name, contact information, or other information that identifies you in the body of your comments, that information will be posted on https://www.regulations.gov. If you want to submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made available to the public, submit the comment as a written/paper submission and in the manner detailed (see “Written/Paper Submissions” and “Instructions”).

Written/Paper Submissions Submit written/paper submissions as follows. • Mail/Hand Delivery/Courier (for written/paper submissions). Dockets Management Staff (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. For written/paper comments submitted to the Dockets Management Staff, FDA will post your comment, as well as any attachments, except for information submitted, marked and identified, as confidential, if submitted as detailed in “Instructions.” Instructions.

All submissions received must include the Docket No. FDA-2016-D-0271 for “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” Received comments will be placed in the docket and, except for those submitted as “Confidential Submissions,” publicly viewable at https://www.regulations.gov or at the Dockets Management Staff between 9 a.m. And 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, 240-402-7500. • Confidential Submissions—To submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made publicly available, submit your comments only as a written/paper submission. You should submit two copies total.

One copy will include the information you claim to be confidential with a heading or cover note that states “THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION.” The Agency will review this copy, including the claimed confidential information, in its consideration of comments. The second copy, which will have the claimed confidential information redacted/blacked out, will be available for public viewing and posted on https://www.regulations.gov. Submit both copies to the Dockets Management Staff. If you do not wish your name and contact information to be made publicly available, you can provide this information on the cover sheet and not in the body of your comments and you must identify this information as “confidential.” Any information marked as “confidential” will not be disclosed except in accordance with 21 CFR 10.20 and other applicable disclosure law. For more information about FDA's posting of comments to public dockets, see 80 FR 56469, September 18, 2015, or access the information at.

Https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2015-09-18/​pdf/​2015-23389.pdf. Docket. For access to the docket to read background documents or the electronic and written/paper comments received, go to https://www.regulations.gov and insert the docket number, found in brackets in the heading of this document, into the “Search” box and follow the prompts and/or go to the Dockets Management Staff, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852, 240-402-7500. You may submit comments on any guidance at any time (see 21 CFR 10.115(g)(5)).

Submit written requests for single copies of this revised draft guidance to the Division of Drug Information, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10001 New Hampshire Ave., Hillandale Building, 4th Floor, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your request or include a fax number to which the revised draft guidance may be sent. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for information on electronic access to the revised draft guidance. Start Further Info With regard to the revised draft guidance. Tracy Rupp, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg.

51, Silver Spring, MD 20993, 301-796-3100. With regard to the proposed collection of information. Domini Bean, Office of Operations, Food and Drug Administration, Three White Flint North, 10A-12M, 11601 Landsdown St., North Bethesda, MD 20852, 301-796-5733, PRAStaff@fda.hhs.gov. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I. Background FDA is announcing the availability of a revised draft guidance for industry entitled “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” Pharmacies located within a hospital, or standalone pharmacies that are part of a health system, frequently provide compounded drug products for administration within the hospital or health system.

Some of these compounders seek to compound under section 503A of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 353a) and others have registered with FDA as outsourcing facilities and are subject to section 503B of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 353b). Section 503A of the FD&C Act describes the conditions that must be satisfied for human drug products compounded by a licensed pharmacist in a State-licensed pharmacy or Federal facility, or by a licensed physician, to be exempt from the following three sections of the FD&C Act. Section 501(a)(2)(B) (21 U.S.C.

351(a)(2)(B)) (concerning current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) requirements). Section 502(f)(1) (21 U.S.C. 352(f)(1)) (concerning the labeling of drugs with adequate directions for use). And Section 505 (21 U.S.C. 355) (concerning the approval of drugs under new drug applications or abbreviated new drug applications).

This revised draft guidance proposes policies for FDA's application of certain provisions of section 503A of the FD&C Act to human drug products compounded by State-licensed pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities and distributed for use within a hospital or health system. First, the revised draft guidance addresses the requirement that compounding be based on the receipt of a valid prescription order for an identified individual patient. Second, it addresses the provision concerning compounded drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially available drug product. This revised draft guidance does not apply to human drug products compounded by outsourcing facilities under section 503B of the FD&C Act, compounded drug products that are not distributed for use within a hospital or health system, or drug products compounded for use in animals. In the Federal Register of April 18, 2016 (81 FR 22610), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled, “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” Start Printed Page 55849 (“draft guidance”).

The draft guidance proposed new policies for the application of section 503A of the FD&C Act to drug products compounded by licensed pharmacists or physicians in State-licensed hospital or health system pharmacies. In particular, the draft guidance described certain circumstances under which FDA generally would not intend to take action if a hospital or health system pharmacy distributed compounded drug products without first receiving a patient-specific prescription or order. The comment period on the initial draft guidance ended on July 18, 2016. FDA received approximately 76 comments on the draft guidance. FDA is issuing a revised draft guidance with certain changes made in response to received comments or on its own initiative.

For example, the prescription requirement enforcement policy described in the revised draft guidance does not consider whether the drug products are distributed only to healthcare facilities that are located within a 1-mile radius of the compounding pharmacy (“1-mile radius policy”). Instead, the Agency is proposing a two-part, risk-based compliance policy. In addition, the revised draft guidance proposes new policies for hospital and health system pharmacies regarding the provision in section 503A of the FD&C Act which states that to qualify for the exemptions under section 503A of the FD&C Act, among other conditions, a drug product must be compounded by a licensed pharmacist or physician who does not compound regularly or in inordinate amounts any drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially available drug product. FDA is issuing this revised draft guidance to address stakeholders' feedback, reflect additional Agency consideration of the proposed policies, and enable the public to further review and comment before finalization. This revised draft guidance is being issued consistent with FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR 10.115).

The revised draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the current thinking of FDA on “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” It does not establish any rights for any person and is not binding on FDA or the public. You can use an alternative approach if it satisfies the requirements of the applicable statutes and regulations. II. Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521), Federal Agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor.

€œCollection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes Agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)) requires Federal Agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, FDA is publishing notice of the proposed collection of information set forth in this document.

We are consolidating the information collection in the revised draft guidance with the information collections and approvals under OMB control number 0910-0800. With respect to the following collection of information, FDA invites comments on these topics. (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of FDA's functions, including whether the information will have practical utility. (2) the accuracy of FDA's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used. (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected.

And (4) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques, when appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Human Drug Compounding Under Sections 503A and 503B the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act OMB Control Number 0910-0800—Revision This notice solicits comments on certain information collections found in the revised draft guidance entitled “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“revised draft guidance”). This guidance, when finalized, will support implementation of the copies provisions of the 1997 Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) (Pub. L. 105-115) discussed in section 503A of the FD&C Act, which were maintained by the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) (Title I of Pub.

L. 113-54). For efficiency of Agency operations, we are revising OMB control number 0910-0800 to include information collections relating to the copies policies for hospital and health system pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities, as proposed in the revised draft guidance document. As proposed in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, among other conditions, we generally would not intend to take action against a hospital or health system pharmacy that is not an outsourcing facility for compounding a drug product regularly or in inordinate amounts that is essentially a copy of a commercially available drug product, if the compounded drug product is administered only to patients within the hospital or health system and the pharmacy obtains from the prescriber a statement that. (1) Specifies a change between the compounded drug product and the commercially available drug product.

(2) indicates that the compounded drug product will be administered only to patients for whom the change produces a significant difference from the commercially available drug product. And (3) describes the intended patient population for the compounded drug product. In addition, the revised draft guidance specifies that the statement would be maintained in the hospital or health system pharmacy to address routine orders for patients for whom the change produces a significant difference, and a statement would be on file for each prescriber that covers each drug product that is compounded. As provided in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, except for the policy proposed above regarding the documentation of a prescriber's determination of significant difference, we propose to apply the policies described in the guidance, “Compounded Drug Products That Are Essentially Copies of a Commercially Available Drug Product Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“503A copies guidance”) to drug products compounded by hospital and health system pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities. As described in section III.B.2 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, if a compounder intends to rely on a prescriber determination of significant difference to establish that a compounded drug is not essentially a copy of a commercially available drug product, the compounder should ensure that the determination is documented on the prescription.

If a prescription Start Printed Page 55850 does not make clear that the prescriber made the determination required by section 503A(b)(2) of the FD&C Act, or a compounded drug is substituted for the commercially available drug product, the compounder can contact the prescriber and if the prescriber confirms it, make a notation on the prescription that the compounded drug product contains a change that makes a significant difference for the patient. The notations should be as specific as those described in the 503A copies guidance, and the date of the conversation with the prescriber should be included on the prescription. With respect to the determination of significant difference described above, we estimate that, annually, a total of approximately 3,075 hospital or health system pharmacies (table 1) will obtain a prescriber determination of significant difference. This estimate represents approximately half of the hospitals in the United States, including those that are in health systems. Of these, we estimate that approximately half (1,538) will have hospital or health system pharmacies that will follow the policy in the revised draft guidance, obtaining a statement of significant difference for the intended patient population, and approximately half (1,537) will have hospital or health system pharmacies that will follow the policy with respect to prescriber determination of significant difference in the 503A copies guidance, documenting the notation on the individual patient prescription.

This estimate assumes that most pharmacies in smaller hospitals and health systems will follow the policy in the 503A copies guidance because a prescriber determination of significant difference will not be routinely needed and can be most efficiently managed on a patient-by-patient basis. On the other hand, this estimate assumes that most pharmacies in larger hospitals and health systems will follow the policy in the revised draft guidance because the need for a prescriber determination of significant difference is more routinely necessary and, therefore, most efficiently managed with a statement of significant difference that is maintained in the hospital or health system pharmacy to address routine orders for patients for whom the change produces a significant difference. We estimate that, annually, approximately 1,538 hospital or health system pharmacies following the policy in the revised draft guidance will obtain approximately 30 statements of significant difference for compounded drug products, for a total of approximately 46,140 statements (table 1, row 1). We estimate that the consultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and the prescriber to obtain the statement of significant difference will require approximately 5 minutes per statement (table 1, row 1). We estimate that, annually, approximately 1,537 hospital or health pharmacies following the policy in the 503A copies guidance will consult a prescriber to determine whether the prescriber has made a determination that the compounded drug product has a change that produces a significant difference for a patient as compared to the comparable commercially available drug and that the compounders will document this determination on approximately 76,850 prescription orders for compounded drug products (table 1, row 2).

We estimate that the consultation between the compounder and the prescriber and adding a notation to each prescription that does not already document this determination will take approximately 3 minutes per prescription order (table 1, row 2). The average burden per consultation and notation for pharmacies following the significant difference policy in the 503A copies guidance, compared to pharmacies following the significant difference policy in the revised draft guidance, is estimated to be less (3 minutes) because the significant difference determination described in the 503A copies policy is specific to one patient, whereas the statement of significant difference in the revised draft guidance describes the intended patient population. In addition, as described in section III.B.3 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, if the drug product was compounded because the approved drug product was not commercially available because it was on the FDA drug shortage list, the prescription or a notation on the prescription should note that it was on the drug shortage list and note the date the list was checked. We estimate that a total of approximately 4,613 hospital or health system pharmacies will document this information on approximately 922,600 prescription orders for compounded drug products (table 1, row 3). We estimate that checking FDA's drug shortage list and documenting this information will require approximately 2 minutes per prescription order (table 1, row 3).

With respect to maintaining records of the statement of significant difference proposed in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, we estimate that a total of approximately 1,538 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 46,140 statements of significant difference (table 2, row 1). We estimate that maintaining the records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 1). With respect to maintaining records of the significant difference determination, as provided in section III.B.5 of the 503A copies guidance, we estimate that a total of approximately 1,537 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 76,850 records (table 2, row 2). We estimate that maintaining records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 2). Also with respect to maintenance of records, as described in section III.B.5 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, compounders under section 503A should maintain records of (1) the frequency in which they have compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products and (2) the number of prescriptions that they have filled for compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products.

We estimate that a total of approximately 3,075 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 61,500 records of prescriptions that they have filled for compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products (table 2, row 3). We estimate that maintaining the records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 3). We estimate the burden of this collection of information as follows. Start Printed Page 55851 Table 1—Estimated Annual Third-Party Disclosure Burden 1ActivityNumber of respondentsNumber of disclosures per respondentTotal annual disclosuresAverage burden per disclosureTotal hoursConsultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and the prescriber to document the statement of significant difference (revised draft guidance)1,5383046,140.08 (5 minutes)3,691Consultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and prescriber and the notation on the prescription documenting the prescriber's determination of significant difference (503A copies guidance)1,5375076,850.05 (3 minutes)3,843Hospital or health system pharmacy checking FDA's drug shortage list and documenting on the prescription that the drug is in shortage (503A copies guidance)4,613200922,600.03 (2 minutes)27,678Total35,2121  There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with this collection of information. Table 2—Estimated Annual Recordkeeping Burden 1ActivityNumber of recordkeepersNumber of records per recordkeeperTotal annual recordsAverage burden per recordkeepingTotal hoursRecords of the statement of significant difference (revised draft guidance)1,5383046,140.03 (2 minutes)1,384Records of documentation of significant difference (503A copies guidance)1,5375076,850.03 (2 minutes)2,306Records of frequency and number of prescriptions filled for compounded drug products that are essentially a copy (503A copies guidance)3,0752061,500.03 (2 minutes)1,845Total5,5351  There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with this collection of information.

IV. Electronic Access Persons with access to the internet may obtain an electronic version of the revised draft guidance at either https://www.fda.gov/​Drugs/​GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/​Guidances/​default.htm or https://www.regulations.gov. Start Signature Dated. October 4, 2021. Lauren K.

Roth, Associate Commissioner for Policy. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-21970 Filed 10-6-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4164-01-PStart Preamble Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS).

Notice. The Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action. Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden.

Comments must be received by October 19, 2021. When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways. 1. Electronically.

You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments. 2. By regular mail. You may mail written comments to the following address.

CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention. Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850. To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1.

Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N. Parham at (410) 786-4669. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections. More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES).

CMS-10280 Home Health Change of Care Notice CMS-1557 Survey Report Form for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and Supporting Regulations CMS-3070G-I ICF/IID Survey Report Form and Supporting Regulations Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval.

To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice. Information Collection 1. Type of Information Collection Request. Extension of a currently approved collection. Title of the Information Collection.

Home Health Change of Care Notice. Use. The purpose of the Home Health Change of Care Notice (HHCCN) is to notify original Medicare beneficiaries receiving home health care benefits of plan of care changes. Home health agencies (HHAs) are required to provide written notice to Original Medicare beneficiaries under various circumstances involving the reduction or termination of items and/or services consistent with Home Health Agencies Conditions of Participation (COPs). The home health COP requirements are set forth in § 1891[42 U.S.C.

1395bbb] of the Social Security Act (the Act). The implementing regulations under 42 CFR 484.10(c) specify that Medicare patients receiving HHA services have rights. The patient has the right to be informed, in advance about the care to be furnished, and of any changes in the care to be furnished. The HHA must advise the patient in advance of the disciplines that will furnish care, and the frequency of visits proposed to be furnished. The HHA must advise the patient in advance of any change in the plan of care before the change is made.” Notification is required for covered and non-covered services listed in the plan of care (POC).

The beneficiary will use the information provided to decide whether or not to pursue alternative options to continue receiving the care noted on the HHCCN. Form Number. CMS-10280 (OMB control number. 0938-1196). Frequency.

Yearly. Affected Public. Private Sector (Business or other for-profits, Not-for-Profit Institutions). Number of Respondents. 11,157.

Total Annual Responses. 12,385,108. Total Annual Hours. 824,848. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Jennifer McCormick at 410-786-2852.) 2.

Type of Information Collection Request. Extension of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Survey Report Form for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and Supporting Regulations. Use.

The form is used to report surveyor findings during a CLIA survey. For each type of survey conducted (i.e., initial certification, recertification, validation, complaint, addition/deletion of specialty/subspecialty, transfusion fatality investigation, or revisit inspections) the Survey Report Form incorporates the requirements specified in the CLIA regulations. Form Number. CMS-1557 (OMB control number. 0938-0544).

Frequency. Biennially. Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profit and Not-for-profit institutions, State, Local or Tribal Governments and Federal Government). Number of Respondents.

15,975. Total Start Printed Page 46855Annual Responses. 7,988. Total Annual Hours. 3,994.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Kathleen Todd at 410-786-3385). 3. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection.

ICF/IID Survey Report Form and Supporting Regulations. Use. The information collected with forms 3070G, CMS-3070H and CMS-3070I is used by the surveyors from the State Survey Agencies (SAs) to determine the level of compliance with the ICF/IID Conditions of Participation (CoPs) necessary to participate in the Medicare/Medicaid program and to report any non-compliance with the ICF/IID CoPs to the Federal government. These forms summarize the survey team characteristics, facility characteristics, client population, and the special needs of clients. These forms are used in conjunction with the CMS regulation text and additional surveyor aids such as the CMS interpretive guidelines and probes.

The CMS-3070G-I forms serves as coding worksheets, designed to facilitate data entry and retrieval into the Automated Survey Processing Environment Suite (ASPEN) in the State and at the CMS regional offices. Form Number. CMS-3070G-I (OMB control number. 0938-0062). Frequency.

Reporting—Yearly. Affected Public. Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions. Number of Respondents. 5,758.

Total Annual Responses. 5,758. Total Annual Hours. 17,274. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) Start Signature Dated.

August 17, 2021. William N. Parham, III Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs. End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-17908 Filed 8-19-21.

Start Preamble Food and Drug Administration, HHS get viagra prescription online. Notice of availability. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability get viagra prescription online of a revised draft guidance for industry entitled “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“revised draft guidance”). This revised draft guidance, when finalized, will describe how FDA intends to apply certain provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) to human drug products compounded by State-licensed pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities and distributed for use within a hospital or health system.

First, it addresses the requirement that compounding be based on the receipt of a valid prescription order for an identified individual patient. Second, it addresses the provision concerning compounded drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially available drug get viagra prescription online product. This draft guidance revises the draft guidance issued in 2016 entitled, “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“draft guidance”). FDA is revising the draft guidance to address stakeholder feedback and provide further clarification on policies regarding hospital and health system compounding.

This revised draft guidance is not final nor is it in get viagra prescription online effect at this time. Submit either electronic or written comments on the revised draft guidance by December 6, 2021 to ensure that the Agency considers your comment on this revised draft guidance before it begins work on the final version of the guidance. Submit electronic or written comments on the proposed collection of information in the revised draft guidance by December 6, 2021. You may submit comments on any guidance at any time get viagra prescription online as follows.

Electronic Submissions Submit electronic comments in the following way. Start Printed Page 55848 • Federal eRulemaking Portal. Https://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.

Comments submitted electronically, including attachments, to https://www.regulations.gov will be posted to the docket unchanged. Because your comment will be made public, you are solely responsible for ensuring that your comment does not include any confidential information that you or a third party may not wish to be posted, such as medical information, your or anyone else's Social Security number, or confidential business information, such as a manufacturing process. Please note that if you include your name, contact information, or other information that identifies you in the body of your comments, that information will be posted on https://www.regulations.gov. If you want to submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made available to the public, submit the comment as a written/paper submission and in the manner detailed (see “Written/Paper Submissions” and “Instructions”).

Written/Paper Submissions Submit written/paper submissions as follows. • Mail/Hand Delivery/Courier (for written/paper submissions). Dockets Management Staff (HFA-305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852.

For written/paper comments submitted to the Dockets Management Staff, FDA will post your comment, as well as any attachments, except for information submitted, marked and identified, as confidential, if submitted as detailed in “Instructions.” Instructions. All submissions received must include the Docket No. FDA-2016-D-0271 for “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” Received comments will be placed in the docket and, except for those submitted as “Confidential Submissions,” publicly viewable at https://www.regulations.gov or at the Dockets Management Staff between 9 a.m. And 4 p.m., Monday through Friday, 240-402-7500.

• Confidential Submissions—To submit a comment with confidential information that you do not wish to be made publicly available, submit your comments only as a written/paper submission. You should submit two copies total. One copy will include the information you claim to be confidential with a heading or cover note that states “THIS DOCUMENT CONTAINS CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION.” The Agency will review this copy, including the claimed confidential information, in its consideration of comments. The second copy, which will have the claimed confidential information redacted/blacked out, will be available for public viewing and posted on https://www.regulations.gov.

Submit both copies to the Dockets Management Staff. If you do not wish your name and contact information to be made publicly available, you can provide this information on the cover sheet and not in the body of your comments and you must identify this information as “confidential.” Any information marked as “confidential” will not be disclosed except in accordance with 21 CFR 10.20 and other applicable disclosure law. For more information about FDA's posting of comments to public dockets, see 80 FR 56469, September 18, 2015, or access the information at. Https://www.govinfo.gov/​content/​pkg/​FR-2015-09-18/​pdf/​2015-23389.pdf.

Docket. For access to the docket to read background documents or the electronic and written/paper comments received, go to https://www.regulations.gov and insert the docket number, found in brackets in the heading of this document, into the “Search” box and follow the prompts and/or go to the Dockets Management Staff, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852, 240-402-7500. You may submit comments on any guidance at any time (see 21 CFR 10.115(g)(5)).

Submit written requests for single copies of this revised draft guidance to the Division of Drug Information, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10001 New Hampshire Ave., Hillandale Building, 4th Floor, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in processing your request or include a fax number to which the revised draft guidance may be sent. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for information on electronic access to the revised draft guidance. Start Further Info With regard to the revised draft guidance.

Tracy Rupp, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 51, Silver Spring, MD 20993, 301-796-3100. With regard to the proposed collection of information. Domini Bean, Office of Operations, Food and Drug Administration, Three White Flint North, 10A-12M, 11601 Landsdown St., North Bethesda, MD 20852, 301-796-5733, PRAStaff@fda.hhs.gov.

End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information I. Background FDA is announcing the availability of a revised draft guidance for industry entitled “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” Pharmacies located within a hospital, or standalone pharmacies that are part of a health system, frequently provide compounded drug products for administration within the hospital or health system. Some of these compounders seek to compound under section 503A of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 353a) and others have registered with FDA as outsourcing facilities and are subject to section 503B of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C.

353b). Section 503A of the FD&C Act describes the conditions that must be satisfied for human drug products compounded by a licensed pharmacist in a State-licensed pharmacy or Federal facility, or by a licensed physician, to be exempt from the following three sections of the FD&C Act. Section 501(a)(2)(B) (21 U.S.C. 351(a)(2)(B)) (concerning current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) requirements).

Section 502(f)(1) (21 U.S.C. 352(f)(1)) (concerning the labeling of drugs with adequate directions for use). And Section 505 (21 U.S.C. 355) (concerning the approval of drugs under new drug applications or abbreviated new drug applications).

This revised draft guidance proposes policies for FDA's application of certain provisions of section 503A of the FD&C Act to human drug products compounded by State-licensed pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities and distributed for use within a hospital or health system. First, the revised draft guidance addresses the requirement that compounding be based on the receipt of a valid prescription order for an identified individual patient. Second, it addresses the provision concerning compounded drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially available drug product. This revised draft guidance does not apply to human drug products compounded by outsourcing facilities under section 503B of the FD&C Act, compounded drug products that are not distributed for use within a hospital or health system, or drug products compounded for use in animals.

In the Federal Register of April 18, 2016 (81 FR 22610), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled, “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” Start Printed Page 55849 (“draft guidance”). The draft guidance proposed new policies for the application of section 503A of the FD&C Act to drug products compounded by licensed pharmacists or physicians in State-licensed hospital or health system pharmacies. In particular, the draft guidance described certain circumstances under which FDA generally would not intend to take action if a hospital or health system pharmacy distributed compounded drug products without first receiving a patient-specific prescription or order. The comment period on the initial draft guidance ended on July 18, 2016.

FDA received approximately 76 comments on the draft guidance. FDA is issuing a revised draft guidance with certain changes made in response to received comments or on its own initiative. For example, the prescription requirement enforcement policy described in the revised draft guidance does not consider whether the drug products are distributed only to healthcare facilities that are located within a 1-mile radius of the compounding pharmacy (“1-mile radius policy”). Instead, the Agency is proposing a two-part, risk-based compliance policy.

In addition, the revised draft guidance proposes new policies for hospital and health system pharmacies regarding the provision in section 503A of the FD&C Act which states that to qualify for the exemptions under section 503A of the FD&C Act, among other conditions, a drug product must be compounded by a licensed pharmacist or physician who does not compound regularly or in inordinate amounts any drug products that are essentially copies of a commercially available drug product. FDA is issuing this revised draft guidance to address stakeholders' feedback, reflect additional Agency consideration of the proposed policies, and enable the public to further review and comment before finalization. This revised draft guidance is being issued consistent with FDA's good guidance practices regulation (21 CFR 10.115). The revised draft guidance, when finalized, will represent the current thinking of FDA on “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.” It does not establish any rights for any person and is not binding on FDA or the public.

You can use an alternative approach if it satisfies the requirements of the applicable statutes and regulations. II. Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (PRA) (44 U.S.C. 3501-3521), Federal Agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor.

€œCollection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C. 3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes Agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)) requires Federal Agencies to provide a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information before submitting the collection to OMB for approval.

To comply with this requirement, FDA is publishing notice of the proposed collection of information set forth in this document. We are consolidating the information collection in the revised draft guidance with the information collections and approvals under OMB control number 0910-0800. With respect to the following collection of information, FDA invites comments on these topics. (1) Whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of FDA's functions, including whether the information will have practical utility.

(2) the accuracy of FDA's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used. (3) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected. And (4) ways to minimize the burden of the collection of information on respondents, including through the use of automated collection techniques, when appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Human Drug Compounding Under Sections 503A and 503B the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act OMB Control Number 0910-0800—Revision This notice solicits comments on certain information collections found in the revised draft guidance entitled “Hospital and Health System Compounding Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“revised draft guidance”).

This guidance, when finalized, will support implementation of the copies provisions of the 1997 Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA) (Pub. L. 105-115) discussed in section 503A of the FD&C Act, which were maintained by the 2013 Drug Quality and Security Act (DQSA) (Title I of Pub. L.

113-54). For efficiency of Agency operations, we are revising OMB control number 0910-0800 to include information collections relating to the copies policies for hospital and health system pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities, as proposed in the revised draft guidance document. As proposed in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, among other conditions, we generally would not intend to take action against a hospital or health system pharmacy that is not an outsourcing facility for compounding a drug product regularly or in inordinate amounts that is essentially a copy of a commercially available drug product, if the compounded drug product is administered only to patients within the hospital or health system and the pharmacy obtains from the prescriber a statement that. (1) Specifies a change between the compounded drug product and the commercially available drug product.

(2) indicates that the compounded drug product will be administered only to patients for whom the change produces a significant difference from the commercially available drug product. And (3) describes the intended patient population for the compounded drug product. In addition, the revised draft guidance specifies that the statement would be maintained in the hospital or health system pharmacy to address routine orders for patients for whom the change produces a significant difference, and a statement would be on file for each prescriber that covers each drug product that is compounded. As provided in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, except for the policy proposed above regarding the documentation of a prescriber's determination of significant difference, we propose to apply the policies described in the guidance, “Compounded Drug Products That Are Essentially Copies of a Commercially Available Drug Product Under Section 503A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act” (“503A copies guidance”) to drug products compounded by hospital and health system pharmacies that are not outsourcing facilities.

As described in section III.B.2 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, if a compounder intends to rely on a prescriber determination of significant difference to establish that a compounded drug is not essentially a copy of a commercially available drug product, the compounder should ensure that the determination is documented on the prescription. If a prescription Start Printed Page 55850 does not make clear that the prescriber made the determination required by section 503A(b)(2) of the FD&C Act, or a compounded drug is substituted for the commercially available drug product, the compounder can contact the prescriber and if the prescriber confirms it, make a notation on the prescription that the compounded drug product contains a change that makes a significant difference for the patient. The notations should be as specific as those described in the 503A copies guidance, and the date of the conversation with the prescriber should be included on the prescription. With respect to the determination of significant difference described above, we estimate that, annually, a total of approximately 3,075 hospital or health system pharmacies (table 1) will obtain a prescriber determination of significant difference.

This estimate represents approximately half of the hospitals in the United States, including those that are in health systems. Of these, we estimate that approximately half (1,538) will have hospital or health system pharmacies that will follow the policy in the revised draft guidance, obtaining a statement of significant difference for the intended patient population, and approximately half (1,537) will have hospital or health system pharmacies that will follow the policy with respect to prescriber determination of significant difference in the 503A copies guidance, documenting the notation on the individual patient prescription. This estimate assumes that most pharmacies in smaller hospitals and health systems will follow the policy in the 503A copies guidance because a prescriber determination of significant difference will not be routinely needed and can be most efficiently managed on a patient-by-patient basis. On the other hand, this estimate assumes that most pharmacies in larger hospitals and health systems will follow the policy in the revised draft guidance because the need for a prescriber determination of significant difference is more routinely necessary and, therefore, most efficiently managed with a statement of significant difference that is maintained in the hospital or health system pharmacy to address routine orders for patients for whom the change produces a significant difference.

We estimate that, annually, approximately 1,538 hospital or health system pharmacies following the policy in the revised draft guidance will obtain approximately 30 statements of significant difference for compounded drug products, for a total of approximately 46,140 statements (table 1, row 1). We estimate that the consultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and the prescriber to obtain the statement of significant difference will require approximately 5 minutes per statement (table 1, row 1). We estimate that, annually, approximately 1,537 hospital or health pharmacies following the policy in the 503A copies guidance will consult a prescriber to determine whether the prescriber has made a determination that the compounded drug product has a change that produces a significant difference for a patient as compared to the comparable commercially available drug and that the compounders will document this determination on approximately 76,850 prescription orders for compounded drug products (table 1, row 2). We estimate that the consultation between the compounder and the prescriber and adding a notation to each prescription that does not already document this determination will take approximately 3 minutes per prescription order (table 1, row 2).

The average burden per consultation and notation for pharmacies following the significant difference policy in the 503A copies guidance, compared to pharmacies following the significant difference policy in the revised draft guidance, is estimated to be less (3 minutes) because the significant difference determination described in the 503A copies policy is specific to one patient, whereas the statement of significant difference in the revised draft guidance describes the intended patient population. In addition, as described in section III.B.3 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, if the drug product was compounded because the approved drug product was not commercially available because it was on the FDA drug shortage list, the prescription or a notation on the prescription should note that it was on the drug shortage list and note the date the list was checked. We estimate that a total of approximately 4,613 hospital or health system pharmacies will document this information on approximately 922,600 prescription orders for compounded drug products (table 1, row 3). We estimate that checking FDA's drug shortage list and documenting this information will require approximately 2 minutes per prescription order (table 1, row 3).

With respect to maintaining records of the statement of significant difference proposed in section III.B of the revised draft guidance, we estimate that a total of approximately 1,538 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 46,140 statements of significant difference (table 2, row 1). We estimate that maintaining the records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 1). With respect to maintaining records of the significant difference determination, as provided in section III.B.5 of the 503A copies guidance, we estimate that a total of approximately 1,537 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 76,850 records (table 2, row 2). We estimate that maintaining records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 2).

Also with respect to maintenance of records, as described in section III.B.5 of the 503A copies guidance, and proposed in the revised draft guidance to apply to hospital and health system pharmacies, compounders under section 503A should maintain records of (1) the frequency in which they have compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products and (2) the number of prescriptions that they have filled for compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products. We estimate that a total of approximately 3,075 hospital or health system pharmacies will maintain approximately 61,500 records of prescriptions that they have filled for compounded drug products that are essentially copies of commercially available drug products (table 2, row 3). We estimate that maintaining the records will require approximately 2 minutes per record (table 2, row 3). We estimate the burden of this collection of information as follows.

Start Printed Page 55851 Table 1—Estimated Annual Third-Party Disclosure Burden 1ActivityNumber of respondentsNumber of disclosures per respondentTotal annual disclosuresAverage burden per disclosureTotal hoursConsultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and the prescriber to document the statement of significant difference (revised draft guidance)1,5383046,140.08 (5 minutes)3,691Consultation between the hospital or health system pharmacy and prescriber and the notation on the prescription documenting the prescriber's determination of significant difference (503A copies guidance)1,5375076,850.05 (3 minutes)3,843Hospital or health system pharmacy checking FDA's drug shortage list and documenting on the prescription that the drug is in shortage (503A copies guidance)4,613200922,600.03 (2 minutes)27,678Total35,2121  There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with this collection of information. Table 2—Estimated Annual Recordkeeping Burden 1ActivityNumber of recordkeepersNumber of records per recordkeeperTotal annual recordsAverage burden per recordkeepingTotal hoursRecords of the statement of significant difference (revised draft guidance)1,5383046,140.03 (2 minutes)1,384Records of documentation of significant difference (503A copies guidance)1,5375076,850.03 (2 minutes)2,306Records of frequency and number of prescriptions filled for compounded drug products that are essentially a copy (503A copies guidance)3,0752061,500.03 (2 minutes)1,845Total5,5351  There are no capital costs or operating and maintenance costs associated with this collection of information. IV. Electronic Access Persons with access to the internet may obtain an electronic version of the revised draft guidance at either https://www.fda.gov/​Drugs/​GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/​Guidances/​default.htm or https://www.regulations.gov.

Start Signature Dated. October 4, 2021. Lauren K. Roth, Associate Commissioner for Policy.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-21970 Filed 10-6-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4164-01-PStart Preamble Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services, Health and Human Services (HHS).

Notice. The Centers for Medicare &. Medicaid Services (CMS) is announcing an opportunity for the public to comment on CMS' intention to collect information from the public. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (the PRA), federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information (including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information) and to allow 60 days for public comment on the proposed action.

Interested persons are invited to send comments regarding our burden estimates or any other aspect of this collection of information, including the necessity and utility of the proposed information collection for the proper performance of the agency's functions, the accuracy of the estimated burden, ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected, and the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Comments must be received by October 19, 2021. When commenting, please reference the document identifier or OMB control number. To be assured consideration, comments and recommendations must be submitted in any one of the following ways.

1. Electronically. You may send your comments electronically to http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for “Comment or Submission” or “More Search Options” to find the information collection document(s) that are accepting comments.

2. By regular mail. You may mail written comments to the following address. CMS, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs, Division of Regulations Development, Attention.

Document Identifier/OMB Control Number. __, Room C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, Maryland 21244-1850. To obtain copies of a supporting statement and any related forms for the proposed collection(s) summarized in this notice, you may make your request using one of following. 1.

Access CMS' website address at website address at https://www.cms.gov/​Regulations-and-Guidance/​Legislation/​PaperworkReductionActof1995/​PRA-Listing.html. Start Further Info William N. Parham at (410) 786-4669. End Further Info End Preamble Start Supplemental Information Contents This notice sets out a summary of the use and burden associated with the following information collections.

More detailed information can be found in each collection's supporting statement and associated materials (see ADDRESSES). CMS-10280 Home Health Change of Care Notice CMS-1557 Survey Report Form for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and Supporting Regulations CMS-3070G-I ICF/IID Survey Report Form and Supporting Regulations Under the PRA (44 U.S.C. 3501-3520), federal agencies must obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for each collection of information they conduct or sponsor. The term “collection of information” is defined in 44 U.S.C.

3502(3) and 5 CFR 1320.3(c) and includes agency requests or requirements that members of the public submit reports, keep records, or provide information to a third party. Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of the PRA requires federal agencies to publish a 60-day notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each proposed extension or reinstatement of an existing collection of information, before submitting the collection to OMB for approval. To comply with this requirement, CMS is publishing this notice. Information Collection 1.

Type of Information Collection Request. Extension of a currently approved collection. Title of the Information Collection. Home Health Change of Care Notice.

Use. The purpose of the Home Health Change of Care Notice (HHCCN) is to notify original Medicare beneficiaries receiving home health care benefits of plan of care changes. Home health agencies (HHAs) are required to provide written notice to Original Medicare beneficiaries under various circumstances involving the reduction or termination of items and/or services consistent with Home Health Agencies Conditions of Participation (COPs). The home health COP requirements are set forth in § 1891[42 U.S.C.

1395bbb] of the Social Security Act (the Act). The implementing regulations under 42 CFR 484.10(c) specify that Medicare patients receiving HHA services have rights. The patient has the right to be informed, in advance about the care to be furnished, and of any changes in the care to be furnished. The HHA must advise the patient in advance of the disciplines that will furnish care, and the frequency of visits proposed to be furnished.

The HHA must advise the patient in advance of any change in the plan of care before the change is made.” Notification is required for covered and non-covered services listed in the plan of care (POC). The beneficiary will use the information provided to decide whether or not to pursue alternative options to continue receiving the care noted on the HHCCN. Form Number. CMS-10280 (OMB control number.

0938-1196). Frequency. Yearly. Affected Public.

Private Sector (Business or other for-profits, Not-for-Profit Institutions). Number of Respondents. 11,157. Total Annual Responses.

12,385,108. Total Annual Hours. 824,848. (For policy questions regarding this collection contact Jennifer McCormick at 410-786-2852.) 2.

Type of Information Collection Request. Extension of a currently approved collection. Title of Information Collection. Survey Report Form for Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) and Supporting Regulations.

Use. The form is used to report surveyor findings during a CLIA survey. For each type of survey conducted (i.e., initial certification, recertification, validation, complaint, addition/deletion of specialty/subspecialty, transfusion fatality investigation, or revisit inspections) the Survey Report Form incorporates the requirements specified in the CLIA regulations. Form Number.

CMS-1557 (OMB control number. 0938-0544). Frequency. Biennially.

Affected Public. Private sector (Business or other for-profit and Not-for-profit institutions, State, Local or Tribal Governments and Federal Government). Number of Respondents. 15,975.

Total Start Printed Page 46855Annual Responses. 7,988. Total Annual Hours. 3,994.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Kathleen Todd at 410-786-3385). 3. Type of Information Collection Request. Revision of a currently approved collection.

Title of Information Collection. ICF/IID Survey Report Form and Supporting Regulations. Use. The information collected with forms 3070G, CMS-3070H and CMS-3070I is used by the surveyors from the State Survey Agencies (SAs) to determine the level of compliance with the ICF/IID Conditions of Participation (CoPs) necessary to participate in the Medicare/Medicaid program and to report any non-compliance with the ICF/IID CoPs to the Federal government.

These forms summarize the survey team characteristics, facility characteristics, client population, and the special needs of clients. These forms are used in conjunction with the CMS regulation text and additional surveyor aids such as the CMS interpretive guidelines and probes. The CMS-3070G-I forms serves as coding worksheets, designed to facilitate data entry and retrieval into the Automated Survey Processing Environment Suite (ASPEN) in the State and at the CMS regional offices. Form Number.

CMS-3070G-I (OMB control number. 0938-0062). Frequency. Reporting—Yearly.

Affected Public. Business or other for-profits and Not-for-profit institutions. Number of Respondents. 5,758.

Total Annual Responses. 5,758. Total Annual Hours. 17,274.

(For policy questions regarding this collection contact Caroline Gallaher at 410-786-8705.) Start Signature Dated. August 17, 2021. William N. Parham, III Director, Paperwork Reduction Staff, Office of Strategic Operations and Regulatory Affairs.

End Signature End Supplemental Information [FR Doc. 2021-17908 Filed 8-19-21. 8:45 am]BILLING CODE 4120-01-P.

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The agency publishes compliance assistance and best practices in conjunction with these reviews. Additionally, OFCCP established the Early Resolution Procedures Program in fiscal year 2019 to facilitate earlier resolution of cases on an enterprise-wide or multi-establishment basis. Since then, this program has led to 29 Early Resolution Conciliation Agreements comprising $47.4 million in back pay, $4.5 million in salary adjustments, 2,071 job offers and ongoing monitoring of approximately 525,000 employees to ensure equal employment opportunity. OFCCP is diligently working with minority-serving institutions, including Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, and the Asian Pacific Islander American Association of Colleges and Universities. The agency seeks to link these institutions with federal contractors to expand the talent pool and assist contractors in achieving their EEO goals.

The agency responded effectively to the operational challenges of working remotely and set records for compliance assistance as measured by its Help Desk inquiries and responses. In fiscal year 2020, OFCCP responded to 4,765 total inquiries, comprised of 3,477 calls and 1,288 written questions, which is a record for total responses. These results reflect a 44 percent increase over the responses that OFCCP provided to written questions in fiscal year 2019. OFCCP also published on its website opinion letters to provide guidance on the application of OFCCP regulations to fact‐specific situations and answers to frequently asked questions. And launched landing webpages dedicated to specific issues, such as the misuse of prescription drugs, employment of Native and Indian American workers, and focused reviews initiative.

OFCCP enforces Executive Order 11246, Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974. These laws, as amended, make it illegal for contractors and subcontractors doing business with the federal government to discriminate in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or status as a protected veteran. In addition, contractors and subcontractors are prohibited from discriminating against applicants or employees because they have inquired about, discussed, or disclosed their compensation or the compensation of others subject to certain limitations, and may not retaliate against applicants or employees for engaging in protected activities. These laws also require that federal contractors provide equal employment opportunity through affirmative action. For more information, please call OFCCP’s toll-free helpline at 800-397-6251 or visit https://www.dol.gov/ofccp/.

The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States. Improve working conditions. Advance opportunities for profitable employment. And assure work-related benefits and rights.WASHINGTON, DC – The U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has published a set of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on how N95 respirators effectively protect wearers from erectile dysfunction exposure.OSHA is aware of incorrect claims stating that N95 respirators filter does not capture particles as small as the viagra that causes the erectile dysfunction.

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The mission of the Department of Labor is to foster, promote and develop the welfare of the wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the United States. Improve working conditions. Advance opportunities for profitable employment. And assure work-related benefits and rights..

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NCHS Data Brief No female viagra. 286, September 2017PDF Versionpdf icon (374 KB)Anjel Vahratian, Ph.D.Key findingsData from the National Health Interview Survey, 2015Among those aged 40–59, perimenopausal women (56.0%) were more likely than postmenopausal (40.5%) and premenopausal (32.5%) women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 to have trouble falling asleep (27.1% compared with 16.8%, respectively), and staying asleep (35.9% compared with 23.7%), four times or more in the past week.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 (55.1%) were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 (47.0%) to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.Sleep duration and quality are important contributors to health and wellness. Insufficient sleep is associated with an increased risk for chronic conditions female viagra such as cardiovascular disease (1) and diabetes (2). Women may be particularly vulnerable to sleep problems during times of reproductive hormonal change, such as after the menopausal transition. Menopause is “the permanent cessation of menstruation that occurs after the loss of ovarian female viagra activity” (3).

This data brief describes sleep duration and sleep quality among nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. The age range selected for this analysis reflects the focus on midlife sleep health. In this analysis, 74.2% of women are premenopausal, 3.7% are perimenopausal, and female viagra 22.1% are postmenopausal. Keywords. Insufficient sleep, menopause, National Health Interview Survey Perimenopausal women were more likely than premenopausal and postmenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.More than one in three nonpregnant women aged 40–59 slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (35.1%) (Figure female viagra 1).

Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (56.0%), compared with 32.5% of premenopausal and 40.5% of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period. Figure 1 female viagra. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant quadratic trend by menopausal female viagra status (p <.

0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was female viagra 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 1pdf female viagra icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of female viagra women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in five nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week (19.4%) (Figure 2). The percentage of women in this age group who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 16.8% among premenopausal women to 24.7% among perimenopausal and 27.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week. Figure 2 female viagra.

Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status female viagra (p <. 0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle female viagra was 1 year ago or less.

Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data female viagra table for Figure 2pdf icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.More than one in four nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble staying asleep four times female viagra or more in the past week (26.7%) (Figure 3). The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 23.7% among premenopausal, to 30.8% among perimenopausal, and to 35.9% among postmenopausal women.

Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week. Figure 3 female viagra. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend female viagra by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less female viagra. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table female viagra for Figure 3pdf icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015.

The percentage of women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in two nonpregnant women aged 40–59 did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week (48.9%) (Figure 4). The percentage of women in this age group who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or female viagra more in the past week increased from 47.0% among premenopausal women to 49.9% among perimenopausal and 55.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week. Figure 4 female viagra. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week, by menopausal status.

United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES. Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle.

Access data table for Figure 4pdf icon.SOURCE. NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. SummaryThis report describes sleep duration and sleep quality among U.S. Nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period compared with premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

In contrast, postmenopausal women were most likely to have poor-quality sleep. A greater percentage of postmenopausal women had frequent trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and not waking well rested compared with premenopausal women. The percentage of perimenopausal women with poor-quality sleep was between the percentages for the other two groups in all three categories. Sleep duration changes with advancing age (4), but sleep duration and quality are also influenced by concurrent changes in women’s reproductive hormone levels (5). Because sleep is critical for optimal health and well-being (6), the findings in this report highlight areas for further research and targeted health promotion.

DefinitionsMenopausal status. A three-level categorical variable was created from a series of questions that asked women. 1) “How old were you when your periods or menstrual cycles started?. €. 2) “Do you still have periods or menstrual cycles?.

€. 3) “When did you have your last period or menstrual cycle?. €. And 4) “Have you ever had both ovaries removed, either as part of a hysterectomy or as one or more separate surgeries?. € Women were postmenopausal if they a) had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or b) were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries.

Women were perimenopausal if they a) no longer had a menstrual cycle and b) their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Premenopausal women still had a menstrual cycle.Not waking feeling well rested. Determined by respondents who answered 3 days or less on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, on how many days did you wake up feeling well rested?. €Short sleep duration. Determined by respondents who answered 6 hours or less on the questionnaire item asking, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?.

€Trouble falling asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble falling asleep?. €Trouble staying asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble staying asleep?. € Data source and methodsData from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used for this analysis.

NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics. Interviews are conducted in person in respondents’ homes, but follow-ups to complete interviews may be conducted over the telephone. Data for this analysis came from the Sample Adult core and cancer supplement sections of the 2015 NHIS. For more information about NHIS, including the questionnaire, visit the NHIS website.All analyses used weights to produce national estimates. Estimates on sleep duration and quality in this report are nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized nonpregnant female population aged 40–59 living in households across the United States.

The sample design is described in more detail elsewhere (7). Point estimates and their estimated variances were calculated using SUDAAN software (8) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS. Linear and quadratic trend tests of the estimated proportions across menopausal status were tested in SUDAAN via PROC DESCRIPT using the POLY option. Differences between percentages were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level. About the authorAnjel Vahratian is with the National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics.

The author gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Lindsey Black in the preparation of this report. ReferencesFord ES. Habitual sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults. J Am Heart Assoc 3(6):e001454. 2014.Ford ES, Wheaton AG, Chapman DP, Li C, Perry GS, Croft JB.

Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes. J Diabetes 6(4):338–50. 2014.American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 141.

Management of menopausal symptoms. Obstet Gynecol 123(1):202–16. 2014.Black LI, Nugent CN, Adams PF. Tables of adult health behaviors, sleep. National Health Interview Survey, 2011–2014pdf icon.

2016.Santoro N. Perimenopause. From research to practice. J Women’s Health (Larchmt) 25(4):332–9. 2016.Watson NF, Badr MS, Belenky G, Bliwise DL, Buxton OM, Buysse D, et al.

Recommended amount of sleep for a healthy adult. A joint consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society. J Clin Sleep Med 11(6):591–2. 2015.Parsons VL, Moriarity C, Jonas K, et al. Design and estimation for the National Health Interview Survey, 2006–2015.

National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(165). 2014.RTI International. SUDAAN (Release 11.0.0) [computer software]. 2012.

Suggested citationVahratian A. Sleep duration and quality among women aged 40–59, by menopausal status. NCHS data brief, no 286. Hyattsville, MD. National Center for Health Statistics.

2017.Copyright informationAll material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission. Citation as to source, however, is appreciated.National Center for Health StatisticsCharles J. Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A., DirectorJennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for ScienceDivision of Health Interview StatisticsMarcie L. Cynamon, DirectorStephen J.

Blumberg, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science.

NCHS Data Brief get viagra prescription online viagra for womens where to buy No. 286, September 2017PDF Versionpdf icon (374 KB)Anjel Vahratian, Ph.D.Key findingsData from the National Health Interview Survey, 2015Among those aged 40–59, perimenopausal women (56.0%) were more likely than postmenopausal (40.5%) and premenopausal (32.5%) women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 to have trouble falling asleep (27.1% compared with 16.8%, respectively), and staying asleep (35.9% compared with 23.7%), four times or more in the past week.Postmenopausal women aged 40–59 (55.1%) were more likely than premenopausal women aged 40–59 (47.0%) to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.Sleep duration and quality are important contributors to health and wellness. Insufficient sleep is associated with get viagra prescription online an increased risk for chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disease (1) and diabetes (2). Women may be particularly vulnerable to sleep problems during times of reproductive hormonal change, such as after the menopausal transition.

Menopause is get viagra prescription online “the permanent cessation of menstruation that occurs after the loss of ovarian activity” (3). This data brief describes sleep duration and sleep quality among nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. The age range selected for this analysis reflects the focus on midlife sleep health. In this analysis, 74.2% get viagra prescription online of women are premenopausal, 3.7% are perimenopausal, and 22.1% are postmenopausal.

Keywords. Insufficient sleep, menopause, National Health Interview Survey Perimenopausal women were more likely than premenopausal and postmenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.More than one in three nonpregnant women aged 40–59 slept less than get viagra prescription online 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (35.1%) (Figure 1). Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period (56.0%), compared with 32.5% of premenopausal and 40.5% of postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period.

Figure 1 get viagra prescription online. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who slept less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant quadratic trend by menopausal get viagra prescription online status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year get viagra prescription online ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 1pdf get viagra prescription online icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the get viagra prescription online past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in five nonpregnant women aged 40–59 had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week (19.4%) (Figure 2). The percentage of women in this age group who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 16.8% among premenopausal women to 24.7% among perimenopausal and 27.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 2 get viagra prescription online. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble falling asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, get viagra prescription online 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were get viagra prescription online perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data get viagra prescription online table for Figure 2pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.More than one in four nonpregnant women aged get viagra prescription online 40–59 had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week (26.7%) (Figure 3). The percentage of women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week increased from 23.7% among premenopausal, to 30.8% among perimenopausal, and to 35.9% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to have trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week.

Figure 3 get viagra prescription online. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who had trouble staying asleep four times or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status get viagra prescription online (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and get viagra prescription online their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data get viagra prescription online table for Figure 3pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. The percentage of women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week varied by menopausal status.Nearly one in two nonpregnant women aged 40–59 did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week (48.9%) (Figure 4). The percentage of women in this age group who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more get viagra prescription online in the past week increased from 47.0% among premenopausal women to 49.9% among perimenopausal and 55.1% among postmenopausal women. Postmenopausal women were significantly more likely than premenopausal women to not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week.

Figure 4 get viagra prescription online. Percentage of nonpregnant women aged 40–59 who did not wake up feeling well rested 4 days or more in the past week, by menopausal status. United States, 2015image icon1Significant linear trend by menopausal status (p <. 0.05).NOTES.

Women were postmenopausal if they had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they no longer had a menstrual cycle and their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less. Women were premenopausal if they still had a menstrual cycle. Access data table for Figure 4pdf icon.SOURCE.

NCHS, National Health Interview Survey, 2015. SummaryThis report describes sleep duration and sleep quality among U.S. Nonpregnant women aged 40–59 by menopausal status. Perimenopausal women were most likely to sleep less than 7 hours, on average, in a 24-hour period compared with premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

In contrast, postmenopausal women were most likely to have poor-quality sleep. A greater percentage of postmenopausal women had frequent trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, and not waking well rested compared with premenopausal women. The percentage of perimenopausal women with poor-quality sleep was between the percentages for the other two groups in all three categories. Sleep duration changes with advancing age (4), but sleep duration and quality are also influenced by concurrent changes in women’s reproductive hormone levels (5).

Because sleep is critical for optimal health and well-being (6), the findings in this report highlight areas for further research and targeted health promotion. DefinitionsMenopausal status. A three-level categorical variable was created from a series of questions that asked women. 1) “How old were you when your periods or menstrual cycles started?.

€. 2) “Do you still have periods or menstrual cycles?. €. 3) “When did you have your last period or menstrual cycle?.

€. And 4) “Have you ever had both ovaries removed, either as part of a hysterectomy or as one or more separate surgeries?. € Women were postmenopausal if they a) had gone without a menstrual cycle for more than 1 year or b) were in surgical menopause after the removal of their ovaries. Women were perimenopausal if they a) no longer had a menstrual cycle and b) their last menstrual cycle was 1 year ago or less.

Premenopausal women still had a menstrual cycle.Not waking feeling well rested. Determined by respondents who answered 3 days or less on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, on how many days did you wake up feeling well rested?. €Short sleep duration. Determined by respondents who answered 6 hours or less on the questionnaire item asking, “On average, how many hours of sleep do you get in a 24-hour period?.

€Trouble falling asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble falling asleep?. €Trouble staying asleep. Determined by respondents who answered four times or more on the questionnaire item asking, “In the past week, how many times did you have trouble staying asleep?.

€ Data source and methodsData from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were used for this analysis. NHIS is a multipurpose health survey conducted continuously throughout the year by the National Center for Health Statistics. Interviews are conducted in person in respondents’ homes, but follow-ups to complete interviews may be conducted over the telephone. Data for this analysis came from the Sample Adult core and cancer supplement sections of the 2015 NHIS.

For more information about NHIS, including the questionnaire, visit the NHIS website.All analyses used weights to produce national estimates. Estimates on sleep duration and quality in this report are nationally representative of the civilian, noninstitutionalized nonpregnant female population aged 40–59 living in households across the United States. The sample design is described in more detail elsewhere (7). Point estimates and their estimated variances were calculated using SUDAAN software (8) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS.

Linear and quadratic trend tests of the estimated proportions across menopausal status were tested in SUDAAN via PROC DESCRIPT using the POLY option. Differences between percentages were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level. About the authorAnjel Vahratian is with the National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics. The author gratefully acknowledges the assistance of Lindsey Black in the preparation of this report.

ReferencesFord ES. Habitual sleep duration and predicted 10-year cardiovascular risk using the pooled cohort risk equations among US adults. J Am Heart Assoc 3(6):e001454. 2014.Ford ES, Wheaton AG, Chapman DP, Li C, Perry GS, Croft JB.

Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes. J Diabetes 6(4):338–50. 2014.American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No.

141. Management of menopausal symptoms. Obstet Gynecol 123(1):202–16. 2014.Black LI, Nugent CN, Adams PF.

Tables of adult health behaviors, sleep. National Health Interview Survey, 2011–2014pdf icon. 2016.Santoro N. Perimenopause.

From research to practice. J Women’s Health (Larchmt) 25(4):332–9. 2016.Watson NF, Badr MS, Belenky G, Bliwise DL, Buxton OM, Buysse D, et al. Recommended amount of sleep for a healthy adult.

A joint consensus statement of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and Sleep Research Society. J Clin Sleep Med 11(6):591–2. 2015.Parsons VL, Moriarity C, Jonas K, et al. Design and estimation for the National Health Interview Survey, 2006–2015.

National Center for Health Statistics. Vital Health Stat 2(165). 2014.RTI International. SUDAAN (Release 11.0.0) [computer software].

2012. Suggested citationVahratian A. Sleep duration and quality among women aged 40–59, by menopausal status. NCHS data brief, no 286.

Hyattsville, MD. National Center for Health Statistics. 2017.Copyright informationAll material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission. Citation as to source, however, is appreciated.National Center for Health StatisticsCharles J.

Rothwell, M.S., M.B.A., DirectorJennifer H. Madans, Ph.D., Associate Director for ScienceDivision of Health Interview StatisticsMarcie L. Cynamon, DirectorStephen J. Blumberg, Ph.D., Associate Director for Science.

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Last week, without any real pomp, I brewed a couple beers for that thing in the desert. Turns out they were my 100th and 101st batches of homebrew. Yay! They’re both finished – or at least they’d better be, since I’m kegging them today. I had to use Wyeast 1056 (courtesy of DBC) for the […]

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Obviously I haven’t updated in a long time. For the most part, that’s because my brewing equipment is packed up in expectation of moving somewhere or other. Pretty much all I’m doing these days is running in the mornings and trying to avoid heat in the afternoons.

Anyway, I ran 10 km this morning. Probably […]

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It’s only been spring here for about a month, but I’m starting to get back into a groove. I’m sure I’m positively dogging it by most people’s standards, but it’s gratifying to be seeing improvement almost daily.

Name: Track 096 Date: Jun 5, 2013 9:41 am Map: View on Map Distance: 1.51 miles Elapsed Time: […]

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Brewing test batches isn’t necessarily a whole lot of fun, but it does lend itself to some potentially useful experimentation. Throughout my (home) brewing career, I’ve bounced more or less randomly from one Belgian strain to another, in the process collecting most of the common strains, but without really settling on a “house” yeast. For […]

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It is exactly as dangerous as it looks.

Heat sticks are becoming popular among home brewers, and for good reason. Having two heated vessels really streamlines a brew day, and makes double brew days significantly less painful. And the economics of electric heat are compelling (in fact, that’s the way I’ve decided to […]

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Shaved Parmesan doesn’t work quite as well as shredded.

A recipe that doesn’t involve beer?! I know, I’m in danger of becoming a well-rounded person. These are delicious, though, and very easy to make, and quickly becoming my go-to appetizer for guests. If you have access to Trader Joe’s, they sell a can of […]

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Just a quick note. While I was doing some calculations for Two Mile, I decided to expand on a year-old post on draft system balancing, primarily just to include the relevant results for longer draft systems. Enjoy.

Or not. It doesn’t really affect me either way.

[…]

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I haven’t posted in… let’s see… six months. Yikes. Here’s a quartet of beer recipes, though, so that’s basically the same as posting almost once per month.

10.2 Mk2: I’m still struggling to get the attenuation I need out of my Belgian-style “Blond” (I use quotation marks because BJCP-wise, it would be a Belgian Specialty […]

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I’m not wild about the idea of driving somewhere for the sole purpose of running somewhere else, but I suppose allowances can be made.

Name: Track 023 Date: Apr 26, 2012 11:35 am Map: View on Map Distance: 3.01 miles Elapsed Time: 29:41.2 Avg Speed: 6.1 mph Max Speed: 8.3 mph Avg Pace: 9′ […]

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Well, maybe “hate”‘s a strong word. I’ve just never had a wine that I’d prefer over a good beer. I’ll keep trying though. You know, for science.

What I do hate is the wine industry. Bunch of namby-pamby grape gropers whose bottles collect dust and who spit instead of swallow. Which is why my interest […]